Exploring the science of plants, from the field to the lab

New Jersey Transplants “Lichen” Their New Home

Posted in Interesting Plant Stories on October 23, 2015 by Science Talk

Jessica L. Allen is a graduate student in the Commodore Matthew Perry Graduate Studies Program, and James C. Lendemer, Ph.D., is an Assistant Curator in the Institute of Systematic Botany, both at The New York Botanical Garden. Lichens are their primary research interest.


Old man’s beard (Usnea strigosa) on the trunk of an oak tree.
Old man’s beard (Usnea strigosa) on the trunk of an oak tree.

In April, two species of lichens made their way from the Rutgers Field Station in New Jersey to the Thain Family Forest here at The New York Botanical Garden. You might be wondering how they are faring six months later. We took a walk into the forest recently to check in on them.

They’re still alive! A number of them, however, have mysteriously disappeared.

The old man’s beard (Usnea strigosa) hanging on the branches are healthier than those that were attached directly to the trunk of the tree. The reindeer lichen (Cladonia subtenuis) that were nestled deeply into the leaf litter are healthiest, though animals disturbed some of these lichens and they are now fragmented across the ground. About 20 percent of the transplanted lichens are nowhere to be seen. They were likely taken by birds and squirrels living in the forest to be added to their nests.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Check back on the blog next April to discover if the Garden State transplants made it through the winter.

Comments will be reviewed before posting to the site.