Inside The New York Botanical Garden

Around the Garden

Moving to Read & Watch

Posted in Around the Garden on February 13 2020, by Matt Newman

Photo of witch-hazel in bloom

Big news! In our ongoing efforts to bring you the best of what’s happening at the Garden, Plant Talk and Science Talk are merging to create Read & Watch, a new media hub on NYBG.org that will bring you all of the most recent videos, stories, and more in an easy-to-use format. 

You’ll still be able to find all of your favorite past posts on these original blog feeds, which we’ll maintain as archives. Since we’ll no longer be posting updates here, however, be sure to head to Read & Watch for our new content going forward!

Gifts Guaranteed to Make Your #plantlove Grow

Posted in Around the Garden on February 6 2020, by Matt Newman

This Valentine’s Day, show your loved ones how much they mean to you with thoughtful gifts from the Garden. Browse our top picks below.

Membership

Membership
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Give the gift of Membership and enjoy the Garden all year long, plus get exclusive access to The Orchid Show Members-Only Preview and Valentine’s-inspired talks and programs. Become a Member.

What’s Beautiful Now: Bright & Sunny Aloe

Posted in What's Beautiful Now on January 31 2020, by Matt Newman

You can almost feel the hot desert sun radiating from these flowers.

In the desert houses of the Haupt Conservatory right now, you’ll find respite from the chill of winter with these blooming aloes (Aloe ferox), standing tall and colorful amid the cacti and other arid-weather plants that call these collections home.

Aloe ferox

<em>Aloe ferox</em>
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Your Long Weekend Plans—Holiday Train Show & More

Posted in Around the Garden on January 18 2020, by Matt Newman

Photo of snowdropsThe long weekend is here, and just in time for the final week of the Holiday Train Show! Don’t miss your chance to see our botanical homage to famous New York sights—and explore plenty of our other events and activities. Bring your little ones for the last performances of All Aboard with Thomas & Friends, head to the Mertz Library for a look into the architectural history of our landmark Haupt Conservatory, get outside to explore winter interest—like newly emerging snowdrops—in our collections, and so much more.

With NYBG being open for Martin Luther King Jr. Day on Monday, January 20, it’s the perfect time to catch the Holiday Train Show before it disappears for the winter. The show continues through January 26 with all-new highlights from Central Park.

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What’s Beautiful Now: Tropical January

Posted in What's Beautiful Now on January 9 2020, by Matt Newman

Warm, colorful, humid. That’s the Haupt Conservatory in January. The living collections of our historic glasshouse thrive thanks to the balmy temperatures it maintains year-round, and there are plenty of fascinating botanical treasures to be found—from the neon structures of the neotropical blueberries to the spore-carrying sori of the ferns.

Cavendishia grandifolia

<em>Cavendishia grandifolia</em>
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What’s Beautiful Now: Shelf Fungi in the Forest

Posted in What's Beautiful Now on December 27 2019, by Matt Newman

Shelf fungi fun in the Forest! There’s so much to see on walks along the winding trails of the Thain Family Forest, not least of which are mushrooms in reds, oranges, yellows, and browns. What have you spotted lately?

Shelf Fungi

Shelf Fungi
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Our Holiday Train Show Favorites

Posted in Around the Garden on December 26 2019, by Matt Newman

We each have our favorite New York landmark replicas in the Holiday Train Show. Tell us yours—and what you’d love to see added in the future!

Take a look at some of our staff-favorite buildings from the exhibition, like the original Penn Station, the Statue of Liberty, and the Guggenheim Museum. See these and other familiar favorites as the show continues through January 26!

Penn Station

Penn Station
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"My favorite building is the original Penn Station. The Applied Imagination model captures its grandeur and serves as a reminder of how hard we must work to preserve our architectural and natural heritage." —Todd Forrest, Arthur Ross Vice President for Horticulture and Living Collections, NYBG

Biophilia: Look but Don’t Touch

Posted in Around the Garden on December 24 2019, by Plant Talk

Photo of stinging nettles' leaves
Stinging nettles’ (Urtica dioica) leaves appear soft and fuzzy, but look out.

Some of the plants highlighted in “Biophilia: Sharing Our #plantlove,” the Conservatory exhibit sharing our curators’ most fascinating plants, protect themselves with spines, stings, and more. This is definitely a case of “look but don’t touch!”

Thorns, spines, and prickles: Pointy protuberances stab predators as they approach.

Armor: The thickened, waxy skin of many succulent plants adds a layer of protection from herbivores.

Stings: Minuscule needles of the mineral calcium oxalate are found in a wide variety of plants, from philodendrons to agave (which is used to make tequila). The sharp crystals irritate the skin and can be toxic when eaten. Stinging nettles (Urtica dioica) are covered in tiny fibers with sharp points that irritate and inject toxins into the skin.

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What’s Beautiful Now: Holiday Train Show Landscapes

Posted in What's Beautiful Now on December 20 2019, by Matt Newman

The beauty of the Holiday Train Show isn’t just found in the trains and landmark replicas—but the plants, as well! Take the time to pore over the species that create the colors and textures of the landscapes, forming the world in miniature that makes this exhibition a holiday favorite in NYC.

Osmanthus heterophyllus ‘Goshiki’

<em>Osmanthus heterophyllus</em> ‘Goshiki’
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Biophilia: Plants with Bite

Posted in What's Beautiful Now on December 18 2019, by Matt Newman

Poor soil? No problem! If you’re a plant, just spend your evolutionary energy learning to eat bugs. The carnivorous plants highlighted in Biophilia: Sharing Our #plantlove, the Conservatory exhibit sharing our curators’ most fascinating plants, have evolved across the globe to capture prey. See how they do it, from snap traps to deadly pitchers and sticky situations.

Dionaea muscipula

<em>Dionaea muscipula</em>
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