Inside The New York Botanical Garden

Matt Newman

What’s Beautiful Now: Holiday Train Show Landscapes

Posted in What's Beautiful Now on December 20 2019, by Matt Newman

The beauty of the Holiday Train Show isn’t just found in the trains and landmark replicas—but the plants, as well! Take the time to pore over the species that create the colors and textures of the landscapes, forming the world in miniature that makes this exhibition a holiday favorite in NYC.

Osmanthus heterophyllus ‘Goshiki’

<em>Osmanthus heterophyllus</em> ‘Goshiki’
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Biophilia: Plants with Bite

Posted in What's Beautiful Now on December 18 2019, by Matt Newman

Poor soil? No problem! If you’re a plant, just spend your evolutionary energy learning to eat bugs. The carnivorous plants highlighted in Biophilia: Sharing Our #plantlove, the Conservatory exhibit sharing our curators’ most fascinating plants, have evolved across the globe to capture prey. See how they do it, from snap traps to deadly pitchers and sticky situations.

Dionaea muscipula

<em>Dionaea muscipula</em>
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Wearing Winter Like Jewelry

Posted in What's Beautiful Now on December 17 2019, by Matt Newman

A rainy, frosty day has left the Garden’s collections glimmering with ice—and the plants are wearing it like jewelry. Take a closer look at the fascinating result of this gray afternoon!

Kalopanax septemlobus

<em>Kalopanax septemlobus</em>
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Tending Our Trees at NYBG

Posted in Horticulture on December 17 2019, by Matt Newman

Keeping our trees healthy—many of which are more than a hundred years old—means careful inspection and, when necessary, removal of dead or damaged limbs. This important work ensures our trees’ longevity and keeps everyone safe. See how our high-climbing arborists do it, and how the wood that results nurtures other plants in the Garden’s living collections. 

Biophilia: Plants Take Sun Safety Seriously

Posted in What's Beautiful Now on December 13 2019, by Matt Newman

Plants love the sun—but they’re also careful to avoid sunburn, even in winter. Inside the Haupt Conservatory, you’ll find Biophilia: Sharing Our #plantlove, an exhibit that spotlights some of our curators’ most fascinating plants, and the stories they reveal about nature, adaptation, and human culture. Here, see how they use waxy coatings, succulence, small surface areas, and even hair to serve as sunscreen.

Echeveria ‘Perle von Nurnberg’

<em>Echeveria</em> ‘Perle von Nurnberg’
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A Twinkling Holiday Lighting Ceremony

Posted in Around the Garden on December 9 2019, by Matt Newman

Another beautiful annual tree and menorah lighting ceremony. Thank you to the soaring voices of Celia Cruz High School choir and special guests Senator Alessandra Biaggi, New York State assembly members Jeffrey Dinowitz and Nathalia Fernandez, and NYC council members Andrew Cohen, Mark Gjonaj, and Rafael Salamanca. A wonderful time was had by all!

The Annual Holiday Tree Lighting

The Annual Holiday Tree Lighting
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#plantlove: Dr. Rob Naczi, Curator of North American Botany

Posted in People on November 27 2019, by Matt Newman

As part of #plantlove at NYBG, we’re talking with people from all over the Garden about what inspires their passion for plants. Today, meet Rob Naczi, Curator of North American Botany at The New York Botanical Garden.


Photo of Robert Naczi among pitcher plants

I grew up north of Wilmington, Delaware, and I loved to explore, to discover, and to be out in nature. When I was in elementary school, my neighbor turned me onto birding. I would go on bird walks with him and our club nearby, the Delmarva Ornithological Society. On one of the trips, there were some people pointing down at some spring wildflowers, the ephemerals in the deciduous forest. I looked and thought, Hey, that’s interesting. Gradually I got so interested in plants that I wanted to take every moment I could to go out and explore.

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What’s Beautiful Now: Fallen Fall

Posted in What's Beautiful Now on November 22 2019, by Matt Newman

Fallen leaves are no less beautiful. As this season of transition continues, don’t forget to look down as well as up—you might catch the bright yellows (like these Ginkgo leaves), reds, and oranges of the recent forest splendor still carrying on toward winter.

Photo of Ginkgo leaves on the ground