Plant Talk

Inside The New York Botanical Garden

#plantlove: Anais Garcia, Summer Youth Employment Program Intern with Bronx Green-Up and the NYC Compost Project

Posted in People on August 16 2019, by Matt Newman

As part of #plantlove at NYBG, we’re talking with people from all over the Garden about what inspires their passion for plants. Today, meet Anais Garcia, a Summer Youth Employment Program Intern with Bronx Green-Up and the NYC Compost Project at The New York Botanical Garden.


Photo of Anais GarciaAt a young age, I was exposed to plants while living with my grandmother. I may not have quite the green thumb she does, but I sure do like to have plants in my household—it just brings a calm aura to everything I do at home.

I’m glad I chose this internship because it opened my eyes to plants I wouldn’t normally see in my neighborhood. I have experienced the beauty of various community gardens and how they thrive, and not only did I get hands-on experience in these gardens, but I also obtained new job skills throughout my time in the program. Some of these skills included managing inventory, using various software in support of our initiatives, tabling at events, and much more.

One of many experiences I really enjoyed was building a garden bed at Morris Campus Educational Farm. It was fun working alongside the students as a team to build the bed from scratch. By the end of the program, I felt proud that I had taken part in this activity because it’s something most people my age haven’t experienced.

From meeting new plants to meeting new people, working with these two amazing teams—Bronx Green-Up and NYC Compost Project—has left me in awe of everything they do in the City. When I first met everyone, I realized that they are not only a team, but a family, always ready to make a big impact on this world.

What’s Beautiful Now: Crape-myrtles of the Ladies’ Border

Posted in What's Beautiful Now on August 16 2019, by Matt Newman

Find your way to the entrance of the Ladies’ Border, pass under the overhanging greenery, and you’ll see the popping color of summer’s crape-myrtles blooming among the leaves. The punchy pink of Lagerstroemia ‘Choctaw’ and the vivid red of Lagerstroemia indica ‘Dynamite’ are absolute standouts.

Crape-myrtles on the Ladies' Border

Crape-myrtles on the Ladies' Border
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What’s Beautiful Now: On the Water’s Surface

Posted in What's Beautiful Now on August 9 2019, by Matt Newman

The beauty of summer’s water lilies is both a vertical and horizontal experience, painting the surface of the Conservatory Courtyard Pools with purple and neon green lily pads while the flowers—in white, purple, blue, and pink—rise up and reflect on the water. The koi fish that take shelter among their stems are an added bonus.

Nymphaea in the Conservatory Courtyard Pools

<em>Nymphaea</em> in the Conservatory Courtyard Pools
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What’s Beautiful Now: Perennial Delights

Posted in What's Beautiful Now on August 2 2019, by Matt Newman

The “rooms” of the Perennial Garden—hot, cold, and beyond—boast a seasonal bouquet of many varieties of summer bloom, including daylilies, hibiscus, and other warm-weather favorites that thrive in the bright sun. It’s the perfect spot for a stroll, or a sketch, with its meandering paths and abundant color.

Perennial Garden

Perennial Garden
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7th Annual NYC-Area Green Industry Intern Field Day

Posted in Learning Experiences on July 30 2019, by Charles Yurgalevitch

Charles Yurgalevitch is the Director of the School of Professional Horticulture at The New York Botanical Garden.


Photo of interns at Hortie Hoopla

Just half a day before this year’s Hortie Hoopla, the weather was oppressively hot and humid with afternoon thunderstorms and heavy rain showers dumping over an inch of rain on the grounds of NYBG. By morning, the sun was clear in the sky, the humidity reduced by almost half. The new day brought a new start for this year’s Hortie Hoopla, now in its 7th year.

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Children’s Titles from Flying Eye Books

Posted in From the Library on July 29 2019, by Samantha D’Acunto

Samantha D’Acunto is the Reference Librarian at The New York Botanical Garden‘s LuEsther T. Mertz Library.


The cover of "Fanatical About Frogs", showing an illustration of several frogs, a tadpole, and frog eggs.This summer the LuEsther T. Mertz Library welcomes titles from Flying Eye Books into the children’s circulating collection. Titles include tales of remarkable trees, poisonous frogs, colorful birds, funky beetles, and budding gardeners. All of the titles listed below feature refreshing and vibrant illustrations that pop right off the page. 

Owen Davey’s Fanatical About Frogs and Bonkers About Beetles are impressive compilations of information and illustration. The two titles are part of a larger series by Owen Davey that include titles Mad About Monkeys, Crazy about Cats, and Smart About Sharks. As far as non-fiction goes, these are a must have. They are thrilling, colorful and informative. 

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#plantlove: Joel Ramirez, Web Developer for Biodiversity Information Management

Posted in People on July 29 2019, by Matt Newman

As part of #plantlove at NYBG, we’re talking with people from all over the Garden about what inspires their passion for plants. Today, meet Joel Ramirez, Web Developer for Biodiversity Information Management in the Steere Herbarium.


Photo of Joel Ramirez

My interest in plants started back in high school when I joined the Environmental Club. They offered a program with Wave Hill to learn the invaluable skills for pruning, growing, and composting plants. These types of school-garden partnerships in the Bronx with institutions such as these, including NYBG, help foster a connection between young adults and nature—educating students about the environment. Watching our school garden grow and become a safe haven was uncommon growing up in the Bronx. A “diamond in the dirt,” bringing peace into my heart. Nine years later, I’ve been able to fuse my passion for technology with plant science here at the Garden. Though they cannot speak, plants still communicate with us in their own way, and we must come together to ensure their well-being. Plants are the reason we’re able to live.